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Save the Pine Bush

It’s a tale that could end up on a milk carton. Tender youngsters are snatched from their cradles and carried off to underground lairs, never to be seen again. “The one thing we know is that the Karner Blue Butterfly eggs are disappearing,” said Dr. Peter Spoor, speaking at the SPB lasagna dinner on May

Save the Pine Bush

Karner Blue Butterfly eggs are being cut open and eaten, and still no culprit has been found. The ants, however, have not been ruled out as suspects. Dr. Peter Spoor gave an update on his investigations into the lifestyle and habits of the friendly butterfly at the Sept. 26 dinner at the Unitarian Church. Stunning

Save the Pine Bush

Resting on a leaf, click on photo to see larger picture. So much controversy over such a tiny butterfly-the Karner Blue, Lycaeides melissa samuelis. A beautiful pale blue, this tiny creature only lives in its adult form for one to two weeks. Named by Vladimir Nabokov (probably better known for his writing than his lepidoptery),

Save the Pine Bush

Dear Save the Pine Bush: I know the Karner Blue feeds on wild lupine, can any of your biologists or naturalists tell me if it feeds on domestic lupine? Has domestic lupine ever been planted as an experiment to see what would happen? Faithful Reader Dear Faithful Reader: As far as I know, the Karner

Save the Pine Bush

The walk in the Pine Bush on May 26 hosted by John Wolcott and Mark Plaat found no butterflies, and blue lupine just beginning to flower. The walk led by Lynne Jackson and Daniel Van Riper on June 2, however, saw the lupine in full bloom and the first butterflies scattered here and there. Some

Save the Pine Bush

Developer Jerry Phibbs has not denied bulldozing a patch of lupine that probably supported a colony of Karner Blue butterflies on his land in Colonie, just days before the butterflies were ready to hatch. At the Town of Colonie Planning Board meeting on May 30, where the charges were leveled by outraged speakers, Mr. Phibbs

Opinion – Saving butterflies

Opinion – Saving butterflies Opinion – Saving butterflies The following editorial is reprinted with permission from the Concord New Hampshire Monitor. This editorial appeared on the Opinion page on September 1, 1989. This editorial is about a tiny plot of land near Concord New Hampshire, where a few Karner Blues make their home. It may

Save the Pine Bush

A Karner Blue Butterfly rests on a blue lupine plant, photograph by Doug Morse Back to Karner Blue Butterfly Article Page

Save the Pine Bush

A pair of right wing propagandists are using misinformation about the Pine Bush and the Karner Blue Butterfly to attack grass-roots preservation efforts across America, and are calling for overturning the Federal Endangered Species Act. Hailed as the new bible of radical anti-environmentalism, Noah’s Choice, The Future Of Endangered Species, is the product of rightist

Save the Pine Bush

Around the world, scientists and conservationists are watching the 20,000 species of butterflies more closely than ever-for signs of climate change as well as other habitat disturbance. “Wild flowers with wings,” it turns out, do more than pollinate plants, feed songbirds, and delight the eye. Because of their exacting environmental requirements, some butterflies function as